• library@msu.ac.th
  • Academic Resource Center Mahasarakham University

Narrative Expansions: The Theory and Practice of 'Decolonising' Academic Libraries

This book brings together key ideas and theories to explore and problematise the concept of decolonising the library. This is an area of critical concern in the UK HE sector where decolonisation has moved from the radical margins to the centre of many institutions (teaching, learning, and research) policy and practices. Split into three distinct sections, the book first discusses the origins of the decolonisation movement, how knowledge production and validation are theorised within decolonisation and post-colonialism, and how this relates to the academic library and archive. Section 2 looks at the work practices — both practical and theoretical — that are emerging in libraries and archives, addressing issues such as reading lists and Eurocentricism; recruitment to the library profession and barriers to change; new approaches to incorporate decolonisation into information literacies and more. Finally, section 3 reflects on the nature and effectiveness of these practices that seek to address decolonisation, what else libraries might do, and what measures of impact are possible. It will also dare to envision a future of libraries and the profession as truly inclusive. This book will provide readers with an understanding of some of the key theoretical perspectives that inform decolonising libraries combining them with a wealth of practical insights and ideas that can be applied or debated in their own setting.

ใส่ตะกร้า
  • ISBN9781783304974
  • ประเภท E-Book
  • ผู้แต่ง Jess Crilly
  • สำนักพิมพ์ Facet pub
  • ครั้งที่พิมพ์ 1
  • ปีที่พิมพ์2021
  • ภาษาภาษาอังกฤษ
  • หมวดหมู่เทคโนโลยีสารสนเทศ / บรรณารักษ์
: ข้อมูลหนังสือ

This book brings together key ideas and theories to explore and problematise the concept of decolonising the library. This is an area of critical concern in the UK HE sector where decolonisation has moved from the radical margins to the centre of many institutions (teaching, learning, and research) policy and practices. Split into three distinct sections, the book first discusses the origins of the decolonisation movement, how knowledge production and validation are theorised within decolonisation and post-colonialism, and how this relates to the academic library and archive. Section 2 looks at the work practices — both practical and theoretical — that are emerging in libraries and archives, addressing issues such as reading lists and Eurocentricism; recruitment to the library profession and barriers to change; new approaches to incorporate decolonisation into information literacies and more. Finally, section 3 reflects on the nature and effectiveness of these practices that seek to address decolonisation, what else libraries might do, and what measures of impact are possible. It will also dare to envision a future of libraries and the profession as truly inclusive. This book will provide readers with an understanding of some of the key theoretical perspectives that inform decolonising libraries combining them with a wealth of practical insights and ideas that can be applied or debated in their own setting.